Less thoroughly braindead NPCs.

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Less thoroughly braindead NPCs.

This'd be modestly hard, but...the framework being used for Spacegame already uses it. If hungry, an NPC will seek food-if in the wilds, from a forest/field tile, if near a settlement, from the settlement. If thirsty, they'll seek a water source. If overloaded, they'll head back to a camp or a settlement to unload. If cold, they'll light a fire.

It's basic beyond belief, but I get a little tired of seeing an NPC spawn, and a bare two days later heading back and seeing a pile of rotting meat. I mean, come on.

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Would be cool. A proper survival simulation for the NPCs should be in the top 10 of the things that NEO 2 does better... Alongside so many other things that are also "makeshift" under the game's hood.


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Agreed. While the direct sequel to NEO Scavanger, i.e.

Spoiler: Highlight to view
Phillip after he crashes in Indiana

Is far away since Dan is working on the more indirect sequel set in space. Still though, it's fun to speculate what he'll be able to accomplish with a significantly less limiting and downright awful engine next time around.

Something else pertaining to this could maybe be NPC's reacting to events you've done in the area (provided they see it, of course)

ex: They see you kill, skin, and eat another human and are therefore more susceptible to the "threaten" combat move. Could also work for Dogmen that you kill, etc.

the indirect sequal also lets him get more practice for what does and doesn't work. still, I wish he would let some select alpha testers in to help you identify limiting factors early on and other stuff that having more eyes on can do.

I understand that maybe he doesn't want to criticism to come with it to get him down though, but I think some input earlier in Neo's development might have changed the outcome of some of the bigger issues. still, we will never know. If it meant alpha access I could curb how soon and deep I look into things and instead just try to give insightful suggestions that align with his goals. I admit, I wouldn't have an easy time of it.

Like I really hope he improves the UI. In this one, managing inventory could have been improved to keep the same amount of detail and feel, without making it tedious via automation, and some other changes that are too late to do now. still, for fun I will make the what-if suggestion sometime. I just won't pitch it until I master the delivery as that matters.

It's too late for this game to fix that specific issue, but it might help future games.

one thing i really like is the lack of an HP bar that magically determines everything, but one immersion breaking bug is the fact that a shotgun blowing an already obliterated arm off does nothing. especially the part where an NPC bleeding out seems to take eons longer than when a player is bleeding out. I have to wonder if it's a bug no one noticed or just me.

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Yeah, AI survival is a glaring omission in the game features. And getting an even basic one running probably wouldn't be that hard, even in the Flash engine.

The reason it's not there already is the same as the reason for everything else that's missing: lack of time :) (Admittedly, also lack of foresight in many cases. And some personal preference. But mostly lack of time.)

As you've already noted, the space sidequel tries to improve upon NS's AI and also its survival mechanics by including more psychological, hygiene, and other peripheral simulations. With any luck, AI is something I can gradually build up from game-to-game, and each benefits from the one before it. Ditto for physiological simulation.

So yes, I'd like NS2 to have better autonomous AI :)

As for alpha feedback, I've found there tends to be a "Goldilox time" for getting wider feedback on an idea. Too early, and it becomes design-by-consensus. Too late and it's hard to change things.

Usually, there is a time at which the game's intent is clear, and a tester can say "oh, I get what you're trying to do here. This might make it better." The space game is still before that phase, though. It's more of a tech demo or broken toy at this point.

Dan Fedor - Founder, Blue Bottle Games