More Wounds, and Treatments

Progress towards operation wound man continues. While my range of wounds will probably never be as impressive as the medieval one linked above, we're getting better (or worse, depending on point of view). I finished up some artwork for the fracture wounds today, as well as a few new locations for cuts:

IMAGE(http://www.bluebottlegames.com/img/screenshots/screenshot-2012-07-19.png) WTB: replacement half-body. PST.

The fractures aren't hooked up yet, though I'm hoping they can use the same logic the cuts for display and item socketing. I'll also have to see if there are ways to penalize activity when bones are broken.

For those anatomically-inclined readers, yes, these wounds are placed a bit arbitrarily. The fractures probably would occur in other places on a real person. However, screen real estate is hard to come by, so I'm trying to fit variety in there at the expense of anatomical rigor. Similarly, the splints are hardly realistic in their placement and length. However, they should at least get the point across.

Treatments

I also started working on some treatments. As already mentioned, dirty rags can be applied to a cut to staunch the bleeding. They will probably cause an infection, though. Or, perhaps there is already an infection? Well, some new crafting items are here to help!

IMAGE(http://www.bluebottlegames.com/img/screenshots/screenshot-2012-07-19a.png) 9 out of 10 raiders prefer "Wolverine Black" label whiskey.

From left-to-right, top-to-bottom, they are:

  • Whiskey droplet - This represents a hefty dosage of whiskey. Six of these will fill a bottle. Drinking this much will get one drunk, or could be used to sterilize a wound or dirty rag.
  • Bark tea droplet - Water infused with tannin from tree bark. Like the whiskey above, can be used (both topically and ingested) to reduce infection. Similar recipe to boiling water in a pot, except it also requires botany and twigs.
  • "Wolverine Black" label whiskey - These are the full and empty versions of the whiskey bottle. Look for them in ruins and junk shops near you! Also, raiders love this stuff.
  • Clean rag - All of the staunching with none of the infection. Dirty rags can be boiled, combined with bark tea, or combined with whiskey to produce clean (sterilized) rags.
  • Dirty rag - This is our old friend, the dirty rag. Colors have been punched up a bit to distinguish it visually from the clean version.

The above tools offer ways to manage blood loss, infection, and pain. For example, whiskey poured over an infected wound will help kill the bacteria (reducing the wound's infection rate), but will hurt like hell (increasing the wound's pain). Alternately, one could drink the whiskey to get drunk, reducing overall pain in the body, but hurting hydration, body temperature, and blood supply.

Bark tea, on the other hand, simply reduces infection. There's no pain reduction, but only a mild thirst penalty, and no hangover.

Finally, there will likely be a few changes to old items as well. Crushed iodine pills are sometimes used to disinfect wounds, so I've made the water purification pills work as a wound disinfectant if applied topically. Even purified water can help sterilize a little bit. Clothing can now be ripped into rags. And I finally revised the water boiling to include mixed water when boiling multiple drops at once (editing recipes is still a pain in cases like this, but I was in there anyway, so...).

It's been a big day for visible changes. As always, still plenty more to hook up and test, but I had a lot of fun today!