Fire, Heat and Cooking

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Fire, Heat and Cooking

This one's thought to be about suggestions regarding fire and all thing related to it, like cooking, torches and so on.- Starting firesAs far as I know until know there's exactly one way to start a fire: lightersThough it seems quite realistic regarding "modern" people I'd like to see some more chances.'cause now: You got no lighter, you freeze to death in the first cold night. Right now there come two more ways to mind that might work.The very classic method of sticks and twigs&bark. Recipe suggestion: two sticks + one twigs&bark = tiny campfireAnd if you're lucky enough to find a magnifying glass: magnifying glass + twigs&bark = tiny campfireIt would allow the unlucky folks that don't find a lighter to survive some cold days in the woods...- Keep the fire burningWell... as said. Using sticks or twigs&bark to give the fire some condition/quality/time. Maybe 5% for twigs and 10-15% for sticks?

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That is a good point about the only one way to start a fire.Another way would be to use the battery in the islab to start the fire. I was thinks there could be two ways to do this. the first would be to brake the islab with some thing (e.g. meat clever) islab starts to burn add that to twigs  you have a small fire.The other way I was thinking would be islab + multitool + electrician + bits = fire starter.  You would use two bits of wire or screws in the power socket to make a spark. Another idea fire fires would be tin can and add fuel of some to oil or petrol to it and then light it for small fire. One last way could be to add the electric start from a gas stove to the game. Have it as a find in mobile homes. The adding sticks to the fire was in another post and I think the dev is going to add that soon. one idea would be to make dogmen and the like afraid of fire so you could set up a fire before going to sleep and not have to fear getting eaten in your sleep. On the other hand the fire at night may bring looters and other humans to it.

Thats a creative idea, however after a long time, the battery probably doesn't have any juice. If the battery does burn I don't think I would want to be near those fumes. Just saying...however it is still a very creative idea.

Actually, a classic survivalist trick for starting a fire is a 9v battery and a bit of steel wool... just touch the anode and cathode to the clump of steel wool and allow the molten metal to fall on your tinder... voila!  Instant fire.

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I like these ideas - the game does hinge quite a bit on having a lighter at the moment. Though one thing about the "sticks and kindling" method is that it takes a REALLY long time to get going, especially if you don't know what you're doing. Having it take movement points to use might be a good way to represent that, since otherwise why would you ever want to use a lighter?On the opposite side, there should also be a method to quickly extinguish a fire - for example if what you really want is the ashes for curing meat, or if, as someone mentioned, a later feature addition makes it so that fires can attract unwanted attention. There probably wouldn't need to be much of a recipe for it, since you can extinguish a campfire just by kicking dirt on it.It might also be interesting if you could OVER-stoke a fire and cause a wildfire or something. Fire is risky! Perhaps also have a risk of fires spreading out of control if you leave a campfire going when you leave a tile for longer than a turn.

Thanks for pointing that out. I was working on the fact that the Islab having some type of long life back up battery and that is what would start the fire. How about this way. If you changed it so there was the Islab Survival. They look the same as the Islab but with a dynamo crank handle for charging, a small light, siren and electric fire starter. A bit like this set up  http://www.jaycar.com.au/productView.asp?ID=ST3352&form=CAT2&SUBCATID=10...If the link dose not work look up Dynamo Torch with Radio, Clock and Emergency Alarm on there site. You could add a news paper spot saying that the new Islab Survival will go down in history as one of the greatest marketing failures. The stock exchange dropped sharply on the news the the new Islab Survival so failing to sell etc etc....With this set up you would not have to add a new item to the game. You could just change the colour of the Islab to note the different types.The dev could look in to adding a whole line of survival items to the game, for the super useful survival knife to the all out useless SURVIVAL HEAR DRYER. P.S sorry about the grammar fail in the last post (hangs head in shame).  

Hi,The type of person who is likely to pay for cyrogenic freezing isn't going to be "Mr Survival". Without a lighter I very much doubt if they could get a fire going. This would probably apply to any person born and raised in a city these days.I've lit fires by rubbing two sticks together and, even under ideal conditions, it takes a while. You also need to have the right type of sticks which, where I live, are pretty specific. Picking up two pieces of wood at random and hoping to get a fire going is wishful thinking.If it's raining, or has been raining recently, then the dififculty ramps up even higher.Indigenous people around the world who have developed the fire from sticks method typically live in desert or arid climatic zones. That's not Michigan.Pulling batteries out of iSlabs and hot wiring a fire into life would, I'd imagine, be equally difficult for most people. Even one of those magnesium flint fire starters that they use on t.v (Bear Grylls) are tricky if you're inexperienced or haven't managed to round up dry tinder.I think Scavenger has got it about right regarding fires. Unless you're particularly skilled, it's a case of find a lighter or think warm thoughts.What could be done, however, is to tweak the temperature/freezing routine so that if you had taken shelter indoors the effects wouldn't be as severe.Also I'd be inclined to code it such that if it's raining you can't light a fire no matter how you try to do it.Cheers,Plugger

One example of the 9v battery trick is http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JtRkdttaYqs (you can go to youtube and just search for 9v battery and steel wool for more).  Since 'rubbing two sticks together' usually requires a bow, a rod, a butt, bow, punk and an anvil, I don't expect many people to be able to do it well.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtcwB_0pUC8  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkRlGEaTjAk  (without all the extras: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dPx7-u7Szww)  And finding dry wood is why you just completed a scavenge... you don't think that in a stretch of forest, including the wet wood, you could only find a dozen branches do you?  The point of the scavenge attempt is to find DRY wood.  (Perhaps the scavange attempt should be made more difficult in rain.)  Also, according to the skill sets available to "the type of person to pay for cryo-freezing" Mr. Survival is exactly who would be found waking up... but the point is that 1) you're a test subject rather than some rich dude frozen for a lark, and 2) you are the hero of the game because you're exceptional to begin with.

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